Insolvency: Some Tips You Need To Learn About

If you are thinking about bankruptcy and haven't made a final decision about it yet, it's important that you know what is involved. If you are not a bankruptcy lawyer, you, more than likely, have not dealt much with bankruptcy law. Here are some quick tips to help you understand what you may go through.



Once you have filed for bankruptcy, you need to go over your finances and do your best to come up with a manageable budget. You want to do this so that you will not end up so deep in debt again that you will have to file for bankruptcy, again.

Do not use your retirement fund or savings to pay off creditors. You shouldn't dip into your IRA or 401(k) unless there is nothing else you can do. Though you may have to break into your savings, keep some available for difficult times. You will be glad you did.

Be learn the facts here now when you file for bankruptcy, as hiding assets or liabilities, will only come back to haunt you. All of your financial information, be it positive or negative, must be disclosed to those in charge of filing your case. They need to know it all. Divulge all of your information so that you and your lawyer can devise the best strategy for dealing with your situation.

Know your rights when it comes to filing for personal bankruptcy. The last thing you need now, is a hassle from the legal professional that you hire to represent you. A few years ago, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act was made into law, in order to protect financially strapped consumers from being ripped off. Beware and be informed!

As tempting as it may be, do not run up credit cards right before filing for bankruptcy. Many times, people purchase expensive items, like jewelry, appliances and furniture right before they know they are going to file for bankruptcy. Most of the time, they are still going to be responsible for paying back this debt.

Remember to understand the differences between Chapter 7 bankruptcy and Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Chapter 7 bankruptcy is intended to wipe out all outstanding debts. All of your financial ties to the people you owe money to will disappear. Chapter 13 bankruptcy though will make you work out a payment plan that takes 60 months to work with until the debts go away. It's imperative that you know the differences among the various categories of bankruptcy so that you are able to choose the wisest one for you.


An important tip regarding personal bankruptcy is, gaining an understanding of what sorts of debts can, and cannot be included in a discharge. By realizing that some obligations are not considered dischargeable under the bankruptcy code, it is possible to make a wiser, more informed choice when it comes to making the decision to file a petition.

If you make more money than you need to pay your bills, you should not file for personal bankruptcy. It can seem like bankruptcy can be an easy way to avoid paying back your debts, however it leaves a serious mark in your credit report that can last between seven and ten years.

Fight the temptation to rack up large credit card balances just before filing. The creditor will take a look at your account history. If they determine that you charged a lot before applying for bankruptcy, they can file a request with the court to hold you responsible for the amount that you charged.

Do not take filing for bankruptcy lightly. Remember, your bankruptcy will appear on your credit report for ten years after you file, and you are unable to file again for six years. You may have a difficult time securing credit or low interest rates in the future, so make sure that you save this option until you truly have no alternatives.

Look for a bankruptcy attorney that belongs to the NACBA (The National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys). When you are filing for bankruptcy, it is essential that you hire the services of an experienced and reputable bankruptcy attorney. Attorneys that are members of the NACBA, are also, members of a well-respected consumer bankruptcy organization, so you can be sure that you will be getting the best legal advice available.

If you are going through a divorce and your ex-spouse files for bankruptcy, there are debts that cannot be discharged. Child support, alimony, many property settlement obligations, restitution, and student loans, are all not allowed to be discharged in a bankruptcy from divorce. In very rare cases, some property settlement agreements are allowed to be discharged. Consult with an attorney to find out which ones can.

In your personal bankruptcy documentation, don't forget to account for all debts, loans, and credit cards. Even if there is no debt on a credit card, list the credit card on your statement. Quite a few people overlook these items when filing, and they can lead to delays in the process.

Research your state's bankruptcy laws before filing your petition. The code governing personal bankruptcy is a complex area that is subject to much misunderstanding. Some mistakes could lead to having your case dismissed. Before you go forward, make sure you thoroughly research personal bankruptcy. This will ensure your bankruptcy will go smoothly.

Although it is tempting to toss out the idea of ever owning credit cards again, think again. Although this may seem plausible, this actually isn't doing them any good. Good credit is needed to make major purchases, such as those for homes and automobiles. However, if you don't use credit, you will be unable to establish a good credit history, which is necessary in order to make those purchases. Begin with a credit card that has the very low limit and handle it extremely responsibly to begin healing your credit rating.

Do not drain your 401K or retirement plan, in order to use the funds to pay off debt before filing for bankruptcy. Those funds are protected, so you should hold onto them. If you need to, use them to keep up with the payments for the secured lines of credit on the things you plan to keep.

After reading this article, you now have a basic understanding of personal bankruptcy options and are armed with tips and tricks for navigating the complicated bankruptcy world. Keep this article on hand to refer to, when facing your legal decisions and you'll be on your way to putting your savings back in the black.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *